Configure multiple static IPs with Linksys
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Thread: Configure multiple static IPs with Linksys

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    3

    Configure multiple static IPs with Linksys

    Well, I searched this site (as well as Googling the web, waiting for support@linksys.com to get back with me, etc. etc.) to no avail, so I figured I'd throw this config issue to the gurus lurking here.

    Problem: Configuring a network that will support 5 static IPs I have from a bridged DSL line from SBC.

    IP range - xx.xx.xx.33 to .37
    Gateway - xx.xx.xx.38

    I have been unable to configure a Linksys BEFSR41 to act as a true router and forward requests to other static IPs in the block using .32. Seems possible so maybe I am doing something wrong.

    Has anyone successfully configured a Linksys BEFSR41 or BEFSX41 to handle more than one of the 5 IPs I have with SBC? Are there other routers that support 5 external WAN IPs? The Linksys doesn't seem to support port forwarding for more than the one assigned static IP address.

    More info can be provided upon request...will hope I have relayed enough to generate a response. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    3
    Well, with a little effort and some extra hardware I was able to configure two static IPs from the block of five with 2 BEFSR41s and a BEFSX41.

    One of the R41s act as the router. The other R41 and the X41 are assigned two of the static IP addresses and route traffic to the inside without the need for the DMZ port. This allows me to port forward to multiple boxes from each external IP for the same services (http, ftp, smtp, etc.)

    Although I didn't get an answer here, thanks for the opportunity to post the question. I may continue to lurk in the off chance I can help others.

    Cheers.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Great Britain
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    Sorry you got no initial response.

    I think your question is unusual and may be an unfamiliar subject for most. Most people use those routers because they are NAT routers which handle a single internet address and share the service internally. They are not 'true' routers in the traditional sense.

    Greenstead
    Only Human.

    TCP/IP File Sharing Checklist

    Wireless a/b/g

    If you are waiting a reply from me and none appears, Personal Message me to get my attention.
    Note: My views are based on my personal experience and do not represent practicallynetworked.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    3
    Considering the cost I probably have a dual network configured for half the cost and it is easier to maintain (for me). I can easily grab another R41 or X41 and use the other two remaining IPs at a later date.

    I looked into grabbing a 'true' low-end router, a used Cisco 501 on eBay at around $350 USD (half the cost of a new one), and opted to attempt this alternative. Higher end models run considerable more...into the thousands. During my research, maybe I missed an equivalent Netgear or similar that would have done the job for less than $200 USD.

    Cheers.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    41
    would a cross over cable to the uplink port work?
    with DHCP off it would give you 3 LAN ports open
    1 WAN port open to uplink another

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